Diyar Al Asadi 

Iraqi Artist (1993-)
 

'Darvish' (center) 

Acrylic on canvas with gold paint

62 x 72 in.

$11,800

'Celebration' (upper right)

Acrylic on canvas with gold paint

30 x 40 inches

$12,600

'Persian Composition' ( lower left)
Watercolor on paper

14 x 14 in.

$1,900

'Leila and the Parrot' (lower right)

Watercolor on Paper

11 x 14.5 in.

$1,800

Al Asadi's work reflects the mastery of the difficult and meticulous technique of Islamic calligraphy, with its intricate and highly stylized floral and geometric patterns, its rich panoply in vibrant colors accentuated by gold leaf, applied in complex, interweaving patterns that date back to the XIIth century in Persia.
Al Asadi started painting at the age of 7 in native Bagdad, and by 10 he was given his first one man show which sold out.  
 He received a scholarship to study in Egypt, but could not attend due to the 2003 American invasion of Iraq. He moved with his family to Egypt in 2004 due to continuing political and sectarian strife in Iraq, and showcased his work at the renown Townhouse Gallery in Cairo. 

In 2009, he moved to Jordan and studied at the prestigious Institute of Fine Arts, receiving a diploma in Islamic Arts in 2012.   His work was exhibited in galleries in Jordan, Egypt, and Turkey, and he was commissioned later to work on a project with the calligrapher to the King of Jordan, for which he received a bronze medal. 

His work reflects the mastery of the difficult and highly meticulous technique of Islamic calligraphy, with its intricate, highly stylized floral and geometric patterns, its rich panoply of vibrant colors accentuated by gold paint and applied in intricate patterns that date back to its origins in the XVI th century in Iran.

'Darvish' dancers are part of the Sufi tradition in the Islamic religion. The continuous swirling movement and sense of abandonment in the dance is meant to lead to a trance and altered state.  In this painting, Asadi creates the dynamics of the composition by placing geometric patterns of color in a circles emanating from the center of the composition.  He integrates saturated colors and stylized calligraphy to add momentum and vibrancy to the work.

'Celebration' represents an 'aqiqah' or festivity honoring the birth of a baby boy.   Brightly attired dancers accompany music played on oriental instruments, and guests extend an invitation to outsiders to partake in the celebration.  A sumptuous palette of turquoise, pomegranate and indigo blues echoes the colors used in Islamic miniatures, and artistic license has been taken to embellish and modernize an age-old custom, breathing new life into this vibrant composition.  The Arabic text reads: I found love when I met you, and close my heart to others.'

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Carole Pinto Fine Arts

Fine Impressionist and Modern Art

Paris | New York

info@carolepintofinearts.com

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